DEPARTMENTS » Student Services Department

Student Services Department

Sycamore Academy of Science and Cultural Arts is dedicated to identifying, locating and assessing all students within the school who may have disabilities and providing support and/or services to those students determined by an educational evaluation.  

 

Providing the most effective methods of service delivery to the students enrolled in our program is a top priority. To meet the needs of our students with disabilities, SASCA provides a continuum of services and programs. The Individualized Education Program (IEP) team determines the appropriate specialized and/or related services that are required to meet the needs of the individualized students in the least restrictive environment.

 

Our program utilizes the push in and collaborative service model.  A general education teacher and a special education teacher work together, but have separate and clearly defined roles to play, all in a collaborative inclusive classroom. 

 

 

 

 

A Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 is the part of the federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against public school students with disabilities. That includes students with learning and attention issues who meet certain criteria.

Much like an IEP, a 504 plan can help students with learning and attention issues learn and participate in the general education curriculum. A 504 plan outlines how a child's specific needs are met with accommodations, modifications and other services. These measures remove barriers to learning.

Keep in mind that a student with a 504 plan usually spends the entire school day in a general education classroom. And typically, children who need a modification would have an IEP, not a 504 plan.

ELD Program

All English Language Learners have access to all programs, services and resources. In addition, SASCA provides an English Language Learner support program that includes English Language Development to ensure a smooth, successful transition into academic English courses. Knowledge and skills in English language development for English Language Learners is integrated into the daily instructional delivery of all core and non-core classes.

 

  • Listening and Speaking: Students learn to identify the major elements in passages; they practice retelling by identifying characters, setting and major events. Students use vocabulary introduced in reading and writing for oral communication. Students understand chronological organization by discovering the following: who, what, when, where, and how. This elicits understanding of basic concepts through connection with real life experiences.
  • Systematic Vocabulary Building: Students learn specific categories of words and progress towards understanding the relationship between structural features of words and word meaning. Students use the dictionary with ease and use context to gain the meaning of unfamiliar words.
  • Reading Comprehension and Fluency: Students read assigned texts and self-selected materials with ease and use scanning skills. Students analyze, synthesize and evaluate material read.
  • Academic English: Students master the language of literacy in texts, tests, and formal writing. Students understand and use more difficult, abstract, specialized and technical words by developing stronger background knowledge of subject matter. Academic language is continuously developed and explicitly taught as its own area of study and within all subject areas. It is taught and developed in specialized ELD instruction, through English language arts team-teaching, and in specialized groupings and curriculum throughout the regular instructional day. 
  • Qualified Cross-cultural Language and Academic Development (CLAD) teachers provide English Language Development instruction.
  • Instructional delivery techniques emphasize the use of Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE), sheltered content instruction, and acceleration in academic literacy. SDAIE strategies are presented as appropriate for all students, not just second language learners, as they strive to develop both basic and advanced literacy levels.
  • The strategies include: assessment of background knowledge (point of view), effective use of contextual clues, simplifying input, use of visuals and regalia, checking frequently for understanding, designing appropriate lessons, planning student-centered lessons, summative and formative assessment, authentic project based assessment, academic English acquisition calls for the development of a more advanced level of literacy so that students may achieve deep learning of the more complex knowledge and skills embedded in and defined by grade level content standards, strategies will include: Scaffolding Teachers observe their students and gradually make them accountable for their own thinking by modeling, demonstrating, bridging, contextualizing abstract concepts, building schema, developing metacognition and self-monitoring, re-reading text and presenting material in a variety of ways.
  • Complex reading - teachers help students practice advanced vocabulary, choral reading, tutorial reading, classroom community reading and independent reading of advanced material.
  • Complex writing - teachers help students practice and apply academic language proficiency through writing of topical drafts, special-interest writing, writing
 
 
 
Sycamore Academy of Science and Cultural Arts provides newcomers, at any time of the school year, with additional support that includes one or more of the following: before and/or after school tutoring, small group instruction, inclusion, one-to-one training and additional extended learning opportunities.

GATE Program

 

Plan for Students Who are Academically High Achieving

 

The identification process begins with a referral from the classroom teacher or the parent/guardian. The following steps then occur:

1. A brochure about the GATE program is provided to the parents.

2. A permission to assess form is provided to the parents of eligible students along with a parent/student survey.

3. Upon receipt of parent permission to assess, a group test is administered.

4. A collection of data that reflects the broad spectrum of each student's abilities and needs, and a multidimensional identification procedure is completed. Multiple sources are used to determine eligibility for program placement.

5. Results are released to parents and discussed if requested. Parents are informed of the appeal process.

 

Once identified, a student remains identified as a GATE student indefinitely. Students are identified in the following categories: intellectual ability, leadership ability, high achievement, performing and visual arts, specific academic ability and creative ability. Ethnicity, disability, and low income may be used as added factors for those not qualifying on solely the above criteria.

 

GATE Program

The GATE program is designed to address and extend the state standards and is implemented during the regular school day and may be offered after school in some instances. The GATE activities may include but are not limited to those listed below. The final program design will be based on the student's interests and the availability of resources. Once the general program is approved and student interest is determined, activities and events will be scheduled in accord with state standards. The schedule will be flexible to allow us to take advantage of availability of artists, teachers and others who might wish to donate their time.

 

General Program Outline

The program will be student driven and based on student interest. Interested students, parents and teachers will provide leadership through suggestions and participation. The GATE Coordinator will be responsible for scheduling and coordinating activities. Several of the strands will run concurrently in order to give students choice and ownership of the various activities.

Identification of Child Abuse and Neglect

Child abuse is more than bruises or broken bones. While physical abuse often leaves visible scars, not all child abuse is as obvious, but can do just as much harm. It is important that individuals working with and around children be able to know what constitutes child abuse or child neglect and know how to identify potential signs.

Child Abuse and/or Child Neglect Can Be Any of the Following:

  • A physical injury inflicted on a child by another person other than by accidental means.
  • The sexual abuse, assault, or exploitation of a child.
  • The negligent treatment or maltreatment of a child by a person responsible for the child’s welfare under circumstances indicating harm or threatened harm to the child’s health or welfare. This is whether the harm or threatened harm is from acts or omissions on the part of the responsible person.
  • The willful harming or endangerment of the person or health of a child, any cruel or inhumane corporal punishment or any injury resulting in a traumatic condition.

One does not have to be physically present or witness the abuse to identify suspected cases of abuse, or even have definite proof that a child may be subject to child abuse or neglect. Rather, the law requires that a person have a “reasonable suspicion” that a child has been the subject of child abuse or neglect. Under the law, this means that it is reasonable for a person to entertain a suspicion of child abuse or neglect, based upon facts that could cause a reasonable person, in a like position, drawing, when appropriate, on his or her training and experience, to suspect child abuse or neglect. 

Red flags for abuse and neglect are often identified by observing a child’s behavior at school, recognizing physical signs, and observations of dynamics during routine interactions with certain adults. While the following signs are not proof that a child is the subject of abuse or neglect, they should prompt one to look further.

Warning Signs of Emotional Abuse in Children

  • Excessively withdrawn, fearful, or anxious about doing something wrong.
  • Shows extremes in behavior (extremely compliant or extremely demanding; extremely passive or extremely aggressive).
  • Doesn’t seem to be attached to the parent or caregiver.
  • Acts either inappropriately adult-like (taking care of other children) or inappropriately infantile (rocking, thumb-sucking, throwing tantrums).

Warning Signs of Physical Abuse in Children

  • Frequent injuries or unexplained bruises, welts, or cuts.
  • Is always watchful and “on alert” as if waiting for something bad to happen.
  • Injuries appear to have a pattern such as marks from a hand or belt.
  • Shies away from touch, flinches at sudden movements, or seems afraid to go home.
  • Wears inappropriate clothing to cover up injuries, such as long-sleeved shirts on hot days.

Warning Signs of Neglect in Children

  • Clothes are ill-fitting, filthy, or inappropriate for the weather.
  • Hygiene is consistently bad (unbathed, matted and unwashed hair, noticeable body odor).
  • Untreated illnesses and physical injuries.
  • Is frequently unsupervised or left alone or allowed to play in unsafe situations and environments.
  • Is frequently late or missing from school.

Warning Signs of Sexual Abuse in Children

  • Trouble walking or sitting.
  • Displays knowledge or interest in sexual acts inappropriate to his or her age, or even seductive behavior.
  • Makes strong efforts to avoid a specific person, without an obvious reason.
  • Doesn’t want to change clothes in front of others or participate in physical activities.
  • A sexually transmitted disease (STD) or pregnancy, especially under the age of fourteen.
  • Runs away from home.

Reporting Child Abuse or Neglect

Community members have an important role in protecting children from abuse and neglect. While not mandated by law to do so, if child abuse or neglect is suspected, a report should be filed with qualified and experienced agencies that will investigate the situation. Examples of these agencies are listed below. Parents and guardians of pupils have the right to file a complaint against anyone they suspect has engaged in abuse or neglect of a child. Community members do not need to provide their name when making a report of child abuse or neglect. Telephone numbers for each county's emergency response for child abuse reporting are located at California Emergency Response Child Abuse Reporting Telephone Numbers External link opens in new window or tab. (PDF).

School volunteers, while not mandated reporters, should also be encouraged to report any suspected cases of abuse and neglect. Additionally, school volunteers are highly encouraged by the law to have training in the identification and reporting of child abuse and neglect. The training offered online to mandated reporters, is equally available to school volunteers.

Obligations of Mandated Reporters

A list of persons whose profession qualifies them as “mandated reporters” of child abuse or neglect is found in California Penal Code Section 11165.7. The list is extensive and continues to grow. It includes all school/district employees, administrators, and athletic coaches. All persons hired into positions included on the list of mandated reporters are required, upon employment, to be provided with a statement, informing them that they are a mandated reporter and their obligations to report suspected cases of abuse and neglect pursuant to California Penal Code Section 11166.5.

All persons who are mandated reporters are required, by law, to report all known or suspected cases of child abuse or neglect. It is not the job of the mandated reporter to determine whether the allegations are valid. If child abuse or neglect is reasonably suspected or if a pupil shares information with a mandated reporter leading him/her to believe abuse or neglect has taken place, the report must be made. No supervisor or administrator can impede or inhibit a report or subject the reporting person to any sanction.

To make a report, an employee must contact an appropriate local law enforcement or county child welfare agency, listed below. This legal obligation is not satisfied by making a report of the incident to a supervisor or to the school. An appropriate law enforcement agency may be one of the following:

  • A Police or Sheriff’s Department (not including a school district police department or school security department).
  • A County Probation Department, if designated by the county to receive child abuse reports.
  • A County Welfare Department/County Child Protective Services.

The report should be made immediately over the telephone and should be followed up in writing. The law enforcement agency has special forms for this purpose that they will ask you to complete. If a report cannot be made immediately over the telephone, then an initial report may be made via e-mail or fax. A report may also be filed at the same time with your school district or county office of education (COE). School districts and COEs, however, do not investigate child abuse allegations, nor do they attempt to contact the person suspected of child abuse or neglect.

School districts and COEs may have additional policies adopted at the local level relating to the duties of mandated reporters. School staff should consult with their district to determine if there are additional steps that must be taken.

These policies do not take the place of reporting to an appropriate local law enforcement or county child welfare agency.

Rights to Confidentiality and Immunity

Mandated reporters are required to give their names when making a report. However, the reporter’s identity is kept confidential. Reports of suspected child abuse are also confidential. Mandated reporters have immunity from state criminal or civil liability for reporting as required. This is true even if the mandated reporter acquired the knowledge, or suspicion of the abuse or neglect, outside his/her professional capacity or scope of employment.

Consequences of Failing to Report

A person who fails to make a required report is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail and/or up to a $1,000 fine (California Penal Code Section 11166[c]).

After the Report is Made

The local law enforcement agency is required to investigate all reports. Cases may also be investigated by Child Welfare Services when allegations involve abuse or neglect within families.

Child Protective Services

The Child Protective Services (CPS) is the major organization to intervene in child abuse and neglect cases in California. Existing law provides for services to abused and neglected children and their families. More information can be found at Child Protective Services.

Information credited to the California Department of Education. 
 
California Child Abuse Mandated Reporter Training
 
Follow the link below to complete the mandatory training.

CHILD FIND
Sycamore Academy has an ongoing system to locate, identify and evaluate all children birth to 21 residing within its jurisdiction who have disabilities and need early intervention under Part C or special education under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act. SASCA identifies all children with disabilities, regardless of the severity of their disabilities, including children who are:
1. Highly mobile, such as migrant and homeless children;
2. Wards of the State;
3. Suspected of having a disability even though they advance from grade to grade; or
4. Home schooled.
SASCA's  child find efforts include:
1. Communication to Parents/Guardians, informing parents and guardians about the availability of special education and related services and providing them with information about initiating a referral for a special education evaluation, including information about early intervention under Part C and special education under Part B.
2. Staff awareness. Ensuring that staff members are knowledgeable about the characteristics of children with disabilities and in need of special education, and the referral process for all children, including infants or preschool children, suspected of having disabilities.
 
Child Abuse and Neglect
How to File a Complaint of Child Abuse Committed at a School Site
 
Parents and guardians of pupils have the right to file a complaint against a school employee or other
person that they suspect has engaged in abuse of a child at a school site. To file a complaint, the parent
or guardian must file a formal report with an appropriate local law enforcement agency. An appropriate
law enforcement agency may be one of the following:
• A Police or Sheriff’s Department (not including a school district police department or school
security department)
• A County Probation Department if designated by the county to receive child abuse reports, or
• A County Welfare Department/County Child Protective Services
The complaint may be filed over the telephone, in person, or in writing. A complaint may also be filed at
the same time with your school district or county office of education. School districts and county offices
of education, however, do not investigate child abuse allegations.
For more information on child abuse and child abuse reporting, visit the California Department of
Education web site: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/ss/ap
Food Banks (951) 444-1404
Community Mission of Hope
Food distribution site: 41760 Rider Way
Temecula, CA  92590
Food: Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays 10:00 a.m- 12:00 p.m.
Offers case management and housing assistance
 
Community Care Program (The Bridge Church)
38801 Calistoga Drive
Murrieta, CA  92563
(951) 600-9112 ext. 100
Food/clothing/hygiene: Sundays at 10:45 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
 
Compassion Community-Grater Works Church
25823 Jefferson Ave.
Murrieta, CA  92562
(951) 595-2288
Food bank: First and third Sunday of the month. Registration 8:00-8:30 a.m.
Food distribution at 1:00 p.m.
 
Circle of Care MInistry
26090 Ynez Rd.
Temecula, CA  92591
Provides food/clothing/hygiene supplies on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays at 11:30 a.m.
Bring your own bag
 
 
California Department of Health Care Services (916) 322-7445
  • Children & Youth Health
  • Adult Health
  • Medi-Cal & Denti-Cal
  • Mental Health & Substance Use Disorder Services
  • Community Health
 
American Society for Deaf Children (800) 942-2732
Information for families with deaf children
 
If a student is struggling either academically or socially, the classroom teacher will implement intervention strategies to remediate the problem. When further measures are required, the teacher or parent will request a Student Success team meeting. As deemed appropriate, the team will include the parents, classroom teacher, an administrator or designee, the Student Success team Coordinator, education specialist, nurse, school psychologist, and/or student. The needs of the student will determine the make-up of the team. The team will identify the student's strengths and weaknesses, and then develop a "Success Plan." 
 
A Success Plan may include modifications of classroom work and assessments and/or further formal testing. Student Success teams will revisit student progress and implementation of modifications to determine their recommendations for placement in special programs and/or referrals to other support personnel will be made, if necessary. Servicing may include push-in (full inclusion), pullout, and/or consultation.
The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act for Homeless Children and Youth entitles all homeless
school-aged children to the same free and appropriate public education that is provided to non-homeless students. Every school district must appoint a liaison to assist these students.
 
A homeless student is defined as a person between the ages of birth (Early Head Start and Head Start
Programs) and twenty-two (special education students) who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate
nighttime residence and may temporarily:

• Live in an emergency or transitional shelter; abandoned building, parked car, or other facility not
designed as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings;
• Live “doubled-up” with another family, due to loss of housing stemming from financial problems
(e.g., loss of job, eviction or natural disaster);
• Live in a hotel or motel;
• Live in a trailer park or campsite with their family;
• Have been abandoned at a hospital;
• Be awaiting foster placement in limited circumstances;
• Reside in a home for school-aged, unwed mothers or mothers-to-be if there are no other
available living accommodations; or
• Be abandoned, runaway, or pushed out youth or migrant youth that qualifies as homeless
because he/she is living in circumstances described above.
 
A homeless student has the right to attend either the school of origin (the school that the student was
last enrolled or attended when last housed) or the current school of residence. If a dispute arises over
school selection or enrollment, the parent/guardian has the right to dispute the school’s decision by
contacting the district’s homeless liaison at and following the district’s dispute resolution policy.
 
The law requires the immediate enrollment of homeless students, which is defined as “attending class
and participating fully in school activities”. Schools cannot delay or prevent the enrollment of a student
due to the lack of school or immunization records. It is the responsibility of the district homeless liaison
to refer parents to all programs and services for which the student is eligible. Referrals may include, but
is not limited to: free nutrition, special education services, tutoring, English Language Learners
programs, Gifted and Talented Education program, preschool, before and after school services or any
other program offered by the school or district. The district shall ensure that transportation is provided,
at the request of the parent/guardian/unaccompanied homeless youth, to and from the school of origin,
if feasible.
 
Unaccompanied youth; such as teen parents not living with their parent or guardian or students that
have runaway or have been pushed out of their homes, have access to these same rights.
 
A homeless student that transfers schools after the second year of high school and is greatly deficient in
credits may be able to graduate within four years with reduced state requirements. School districts are
required to issue and accept partial credit for courses that have been satisfactorily completed.

A minor between the ages of 6 and 18 is subject to compulsory education and, unless exempted or
attending a charter school, must enroll in the school district in which the parents/guardians reside. This
includes a student placed in a foster home or licensed care institution, a student living in the home of a
caregiver, or a student residing in a hospital located within the boundaries of the school district. Any
such student may enroll in a charter school program subject to the charter school’s capacity. A student
in foster care, or a student identified as homeless, may remain in his/her school of origin within the
school district of residence if placement is changed to another district and the school district believes
that continuing in the school of origin is in the best educational interest of the child. Enter your text here...

TITLE IX

 

CONTACT INFORMATION

 Name: Barbara Hale, Title IX Coordinator

Phone: (951) 387-9463

Email: b.hale@sycamoreacademycharter.org

 

TITLE IX OVERVIEW

 

Each student and employee has a right to learn and work in an environment that is free from unlawful discrimination.  No Sycamore Academy of Science and Cultural Arts (SASCA) student or employee shall be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination on the basis of actual or perceived sex, sexual orientation, gender, or gender identity or expression.

 

Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 is one of several federal and state anti-discrimination laws that ensure equality in education. Title IX prohibits discrimination, harassment, exclusion, denial, limitation or separation based on sex or gender.  Title IX applies to both male and female students in any educational institution receiving federal funding.

 

California Education Code Sections 200 through 282 and SASCA’s Policy prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation or gender. Title IX requires that every school SASCA or institution have a Title IX Bullying Coordinator to whom concerns or complaints regarding sex discrimination can be made.

 

Complaint Process

     

  • Students or parents/guardians should report their verbal or written Title IX complaint to the school administrator or Title IX Coordinator within six months from the date the incident occurred. This will begin the informal investigation process which must be completed within 60 days. Complainants have a right to a timely and informal resolution at the school site.

 

  • If the complainant is dissatisfied with the school decision, an appeal of the findings may be made to the California Department of Education - Office of Equal Opportunity.


Where Can Students/Parents Obtain Further Information or Assistance?

 

  • At Your School: Speak to the Administration or Title IX Coordinator using the contact information shown above.

 

 

YOUR RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES UNDER TITLE IX

  1. You have the right to fair and equitable treatment and you shall not be discriminated against based on your sex.
  2. You have the right to be provided with an equitable opportunity to participate in all academic extracurricular activities and athletics offered by SASCA.
  3. You have the right to inquire of the athletic director or other appropriate SASCA administrator as to the athletic opportunities offered by SASCA.
  4. You have the right to apply for athletic scholarships, if applicable. SASCA does not currently offer any athletic scholarships.
  5. You have the right to receive equitable treatment and benefits in the provision of all of the following:
    1. Equipment and supplies.
    2. Scheduling of games and practices.
    3. Transportation and daily allowances.
    4. Access to tutoring.
    5. Coaching
    6. Locker rooms.
    7. Practice and competitive facilities.
    8. Medical and training facilities and services.
    9. Publicity
  1. You have the right to have access to our Title IX Coordinator regarding gender equity laws. Please see above for this Coordinator’s contact information.
  2. You have the right to file a confidential discrimination complaint with the United States Office for Civil Rights or California Department of Education if you believe you have been discriminated against or if you believe you have received unequal treatment on the basis of your sex. See below for more information regarding how to file a complaint.
  3. You have the right to pursue civil remedies if you have been discriminated against.9.
  4. You have the right to be protected against retaliation if you file a discrimination complaint.
  5. You can find out more information regarding your rights, SASCA’ responsibilities, and access information on gender equity laws from the following resources:

 

 

 California Interscholastic Federation:
http://www.cifstate.org/governance/equity/index

 

California Department of Education, Office for Equal Opportunity:
http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/di/eo/dutytoprotect.asp

 

United States Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights:
https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/frontpage/pro-students/sex-pr.html



HOW TO FILE A COMPLAINT UNDER TITLE IX

  1. You can find more information regarding how to file a complaint as follows:

           The United States Office for Civil Rights website:https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/howto.html?src=rt

           California Department of Education website: http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/di/eo/complaint.asp

           Global Education Collaborative’s Uniform Complaint Procedures (“UCP”) or Title IX Policy. Please contact the Title IX Coordinator or school office manager for a complete copy of these policies.

  1. A complaint regarding discrimination or harassment based on sex must ordinarily be filed with the U.S. Office for Civil Rights within 180 days of the last act of discrimination. If your complaint involves matters that occurred longer than this and you are requesting a waiver, you will be asked to show good cause why you did not file your complaint within the 180-day period. If you have questions about your situation, you can contact the California branch of the Office for Civil Rights at the address listed below. A complaint filed with Global Education Collaborative schools under our UCP alleging unlawful discrimination, harassment, intimidation or bullying must be initiated no later than six (6) months from the date when the alleged unlawful discrimination, harassment, intimidation or bullying occurred, or six (6) months from the date when the complainant first obtained knowledge of the facts of the alleged unlawful discrimination, harassment, intimidation or bullying.
  2. The U.S. Office for Civil Rights has its own policies and procedures for investigating complaints. Please review the above link for more information about this process. A complaint filed with SASCA under our UCP or Title IX Policy will be investigated in compliance with those policies.
  3. There are a variety of ways to file your complaint. You can use the U.S. Office for Civil Rights electronic complaint form filed directly through their website; or mail, email, or send by facsimile your own letter or a completed copy of the Office for Civil Rights Discrimination Complaint Form.

The electronic complaint form is available at https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/complaintintro.html

You can send a completed version of this form or your own letter via email, facsimile, or regular mail to the following addresses:

San Francisco Office

Office for Civil Rights

U.S. Department of Education

50 United Nations Plaza

Mail Box 1200, Room 1545

San Francisco, CA 94102

Telephone: 415-486-5555

FAX: 415-486-5570; TDD: 800-877-8339

Email: sanfrancisco@ed.gov or ocr@ed.gov

To file a UCP Complaint or Title IX Complaint directly with SASCA, please follow procedures set forth in those policies.

SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY

Sycamore Academy of Science and Cultural Arts (SASCA) is committed to providing a working and learning environment free from sexual harassment. SASCA prohibits sexual harassment of or by employees, students, or persons doing business with or for SASCA on the basis of actual or perceived sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity or gender expression.  Failure to follow this policy is a violation of state and federal law.

Sexual harassment is defined by California Education Code §212.5 as any unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, visual, or physical conduct of a sexual nature made by someone from or in the work or educational setting, under any of the following conditions:

  • Submission to the conduct is explicitly or implicitly made a term or a condition of an individual’s employment, academic status, or progress.
  • Submission to, or rejection of, the conduct by the individual is used as the basis of employment or academic decisions affecting the individual.
  • The conduct has the purpose or effect of having a negative impact upon the individual’s work or academic performance, or of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational environment.
  • Submission to, or rejection of, the conduct by the individual is used as the basis for any decision affecting the individual regarding benefits and services, honors, programs, or activities available at or through the educational institution.

Upon witnessing an act of discrimination, harassment, intimidation and/or bullying based on actual or perceived characteristics of a protected category (as enumerated above), school personnel are required to take immediate steps to intervene when it is safe to do so. Reporting such conduct to an administrator or Title IX Coordinator can be an appropriate intervention. Once a school or office has notice of discriminatory, harassing, intimidating or bullying conduct, whether carried out by employees, students, or third parties, it should take immediate and appropriate steps to investigate or otherwise determine what occurred. School personnel are to take prompt and effective steps reasonably calculated to end the conduct, eliminate a hostile environment, if one has been created, and prevent the conduct from occurring again. These steps should be taken whether or not an individual makes a complaint or asks the school or office to take action. This policy applies to all acts related to school activity or school attendance within any school or office under the jurisdiction of SASCA.

Any student or employee of SASCA who believes that she or he has been a victim of sexual harassment should bring the problem to the attention of the school-site administrator or the school’s Title IX Coordinator so that appropriate action may be taken to resolve the problem. SASCA prohibits retaliatory behavior against anyone who files a sexual harassment complaint or any participant in the complaint investigation process. Complaints must be promptly investigated in a way that respects the privacy of the parties concerned.

For inquiries about SASCA policies and procedures related to sexual harassment, including how to file a sexual harassment complaint contact:

For inquiries or complaints related to employee-to-employee, student-to-employee, or work/employment related discrimination or harassment, contact:

 

Name: Barbara Hale, Executive Director

Phone: (951) 678-5217

Mailing Address: Box 1400, Wildomar, CA  92595

Email: b.hale@sycamoreacademycharter.org

 

NONDISCRIMINATION STATEMENT

Sycamore Academy of Science and Cultural Arts (SASCA) is committed to providing a working and learning environment free from discrimination, harassment, intimidation and bullying. SASCA prohibits discrimination, harassment, intimidation and bullying based on the actual or perceived characteristics set forth in Penal Code § 422.5, Education Code § 220 and actual or perceived sex, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, gender expression, race or ethnicity, ethnic group identification, ancestry, nationality, national origin, religion, color, mental or physical disability, age, or on the basis of a person's association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived characteristics, in any program or activity it conducts or to which it provides significant assistance.

Discrimination is different treatment on the basis of a protected category in the context of an educational program or activity without a legitimate nondiscriminatory reason and interferes with or limits the individual’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or privileges provided by SASCA.

Harassment occurs when: (1) the target is subjected to unwelcome conduct related to a protected category; (2) the harassment is both subjectively offensive to the target and would be offensive to a reasonable person of the same age and characteristics under the same circumstances; and (3) the harassment is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or persistent so as to interfere with or limit an individual’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or opportunities offered by SASCA.

Upon witnessing an act of discrimination, harassment, intimidation and/or bullying based on actual or perceived characteristics of a protected category (as enumerated above), school personnel are required to take immediate steps to intervene when it is safe to do so. Once a school or office has notice of discriminatory, harassing, intimidating or bullying conduct, whether carried out by employees, students, or third parties, it should take immediate and appropriate steps to investigate or otherwise determine what occurred and take prompt and effective steps reasonably calculated to end the conduct, eliminate a hostile environment, if one has been created and prevent the conduct from occurring again. These steps should be taken whether or not an individual makes a complaint or asks the school or office to take action.

This nondiscrimination policy applies to all acts related to school activity or school attendance within any school or office under the jurisdiction of SASCA.

For inquiries or complaints related to discrimination, harassment, intimidation and bullying of students based on the actual or perceived characteristics listed above, contact your school’s administrator or the school’s Title IX Coordinator:

Name: Terri Marek, Title IX Coordinator

Phone: (951) 387-9463

Mailing Address: Box 1400, Wildomar, CA  92595

Email: t.marek@sycamoreacademycharter.org

 

For inquiries or complaints related to employee-to-employee, student-to-employee, or work/employment related discrimination, harassment, or intimidation, contact your school administrator or the school’s Title IX Coordinator:

 

Name: Barbara Hale, Executive Director

Phone: (951) 473-5370

Mailing Address: Box 1400, Wildomar, CA  92595

Email: b.hale@sycamoreacademycharter.org

Free or reduced-price lunches are available at school for pupils whose parents or legal guardians qualify,
based on annual household income, and complete the required application form. Application forms may
be obtained through Sycamore Academy. 
Sycamore Academy is committed to providing a safe school environment where all individuals in education are
afforded equal access and opportunities. SASCA’s academic and other educational support programs,
services and activities shall be free from discrimination, harassment, intimidation, and bullying of any
individual based on the person’s actual race, color, ancestry, national origin, ethnic group identification,
age, religion, marital or parental status, physical or mental disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender,
gender identity, or gender expression; the perception of one or more of such characteristics; or
association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived characteristics.
Specifically, state law prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender in enrollment, counseling, and the
availability of physical education, athletic activities, and sports. Transgender students shall be permitted
to participate in gender-segregated school programs and activities (e.g., athletic teams, sports
competitions, and field trips) and to use facilities consistent with their gender identity. SASCA assures
that lack of English language skills will not be a barrier to admission or participation in District programs.
Complaints of unlawful discrimination, harassment, intimidation, or bullying are investigated through
the Uniform Complaint Process. Such complaints must be filed no later than six months after knowledge
of the alleged discrimination was first obtained. For a complaint form or additional information, contact: Barbara Hale at b.hale@sycamoreacademycharter.org or by telephone at (951) 387-9463.
Sex & HIV/AIDS Education
A parent or guardian of a pupil has the right to excuse their child from all or part of comprehensive
sexual health education, HIV/AIDS prevention education, and assessments related to that education.
For more information on the content and schedule for sexual health education, as well as procedures for
excusing students from participation, please contact the school site.
 
Anonymous, voluntary, and confidential research and evaluation tools to measure pupils' health
behaviors and risks, including tests, questionnaires, and surveys containing age - appropriate questions
about the pupil's attitudes concerning or practices relating to sex may be administered to any pupil in
grades 7 to 12, inclusive, if the parent or guardian is notified in writing that this test, questionnaire, or
survey is to be administered and the pupil's parent or guardian is given the opportunity to review the
test, questionnaire, or survey and to request in writing that his or her child not participate.
Charter schools are not allowed to discourage a pupil from enrolling or seeking to enroll in the charter
school because the pupil exhibits any characteristics such as students with disabilities, academically low-achieving, English learners, neglected or delinquent, homeless, socially economically disadvantaged,
foster youth, or based on nationality, race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation. Charter schools are not
allowed to request a pupil's records before enrollment or encourage a child who is enrolled in a charter
school to disenroll or transfer to another school. A parent, guardian, or pupil (18 years or older) may file
a Charter School Complaint Form to the authorizing entity if they suspect the charter school is in
violation of Education Code Section 47605(e)(4).